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Posted by nazli on 16 March 2022
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How to Make Your Website Accessible to People With Disabilities

Many web pages contain links that lead users to “click here to read more” or “learn more”. Unfortunately, these links are often ambiguous and misleading for people with disabilities. Fortunately, there are several ways to ensure that your website is accessible to all users. First, make sure that you label your links. When using screen reader software, the links should be marked as “click here” or “read more.” This will ensure that the link is clear to people who use it.

click here to read|click here to read

How to Make Your Website Accessible to People With Disabilities

Many web pages contain links that lead users to “click here to read more” or “learn more”. Unfortunately, these links are often ambiguous and misleading for people with disabilities. Fortunately, there are several ways to ensure that your website is accessible to all users. First, make sure that you label your links. When using screen reader software, the links should be marked as “click here” or “read more.” This will ensure that the link is clear to people who use it.

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If you are unsure of what your link text should say, use generic calls to action. “Click Here” and “Read More” are not useful shortcuts for people with disabilities. When a user hears the “Read More” text, they’re only hearing the tag text, and they have no idea what follows it. In addition, a computerized voice will struggle to read a URL, which can be confusing and unreadable to many users.

Another problem with generic call-to-actions is that they don’t tell people with disabilities what to expect. Instead, they hear the text within the “Read More” tags. They have no idea what they’re going to find after reading the “Click Here” text. They also don’t listen to the URL, which is useless due to query strings. Finally, if the “Click Here” text is followed by a link to an external page, it makes it difficult for users with disabilities to read the content.

Despite the common misconceptions, using a generic “Click Here” link is not a good idea for websites. A person with a visual impairment can’t see the links, so they rely on a screen reader to tell them what will happen if they click the link. Moreover, “Click Here” is not a meaningful option for people with a visual impairment because it doesn’t explain what will happen when a user clicks on the link.

When writing content for a website, consider how usability will impact your users. Avoid using generic “click here” and “read more” links. They don’t help people with vision impairments read, and can also create confusion. The best way to solve these problems is by using a more effective URL. By using a custom-made link, you’ll be able to easily make a website accessible to everyone.

When writing content for your website, you should consider the usability of your website. For example, avoid using generic “Click Here” or “Read More” on your website, and instead use a specific URL that directs visitors to the desired page. If your link text contains these terms, it is important to make sure that people with vision impairments can access your site easily. If they cannot, you may need to include a different language on your site.

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